Tag Archives: Non-Fiction

Mind the Gap – Getting Business Results in Multigenerational Organizations

Available as an eBook, paperback and hardback

When we talk about the generations that make up our society (and workforce), the myths are just as important as the general truths. These myths are very powerful because they shape how we look at generations. They form in these spaces of misunderstanding between them. We must recognize and acknowledge the gaps that exist. If we focus on the commonalities instead of the differences, we can arrive at a place where all generations can thrive.

What are the challenges with a generationally diverse workforce? What is the gap we’re minding? How do we mind this generational gap, use our understanding of it, so we get business results? Many organizations I’ve worked with, and senior colleagues I’ve talked to, struggle to work through how to get the best business results from an organization made up of many different generations that want different things. Today, so many organizations are flatter and freer of hierarchy. Employees once segregated by age and position now work more closely together. The flatter the organization, the more it takes to effectively execute a business strategy.

This book addresses simply what organizations and leaders in organizations can do to focus on minding the gap to get the best business results from their multigenerational employees.

–Curtis L. Odom, Ed.D.

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Nobody Wants To Talk About It

For more than 30 years, I’ve been involved in various segments of the funeral industry, from the early days in my role as a funeral director to my more recent 11-year tenure as the executive director of the world’s oldest and largest association of independently owned funeral homes. I have witnessed the confusion and discomfort that can exist for those responsible for arranging final tributes and services. Throughout my career, one basic concept has remained very clear: informed purchasers of funeral services, as with any product or service, are far more likely to make decisions most appropriate for their unique personal needs and circumstances.

Unfortunately, the subjects of death and funerals are so discomforting for many people that they don’t collect the information before the need arises. In addition, these decisions have become more confusing for many people due to contemporary factors, such as the distances that separate family members, the virtually unlimited options for personalization of funeral services, and the growing popularity of “green burial” alternatives, to name only a few. This guide is a source of objective and factual information. In it, I’ll share information and insight about the many questions, decisions, and options facing those responsible for arranging tributes and funeral services for those they love. It is neither my wish nor intent to influence personal decisions about any form of final tribute. It is my goal to equip people with information that reduces the potential for miscommunication and regret, and lessens stress during what many describe as the most difficult time in their lives.

 

- George W. Clarke

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Character: The Ultimate Success Factor

Character: The Ultimate Success Factor

Available Now

Character: The Ultimate Success Factor demonstrates how character, expressed through perspective, action, and resilience, determines success. Based on the personal, corporate and military experiences of Dr. J. Phillip (“Jack”) London, a successful defense industry executive, as well as many other real-life examples, the book presents the time-tested lessons behind character-driven success.

The book insightfully explains that while a variety of factors form our abilities and influence the events in our lives, character is the key to long-term success. Character is a unique set of moral and ethical qualities that define what you believe in, what you stand for, and what you expect of yourself and others. London asserts that how you act on these qualities – your statement of character – will determine how far you will go; if you succeed or fail. Success is also uniquely defined as acting with honesty and integrity, performing to the best of your ability, and appreciating the people who helped you achieve your goals. Enduring success is never gained by unethical or unlawful means, for dubious purposes, or at great moral cost.

The development of character-driven success is unveiled in 17 lessons grouped into five progressive sections. Based on the architectural wedge-shaped piece at the summit of an arch that holds the other pieces in place, the first section is titled Keystone: Character.  Expressions of character, from personal behavior to the role and influence of others’, form perspectives about success. The second section called Blueprint: Vision, adds the next step of deciding what you want to achieve. While taking the strategic steps of setting out the big picture, character is also developed by using judgment, dealing with change and the unexpected, and identifying unique opportunities to be distinctive. Structure: Action, the third section, focuses on the frequent challenges in achieving goals, such as struggles with taking the first steps, decisiveness, self-expression, and taking the lead. The value of our efforts is examined in the fourth section called Appraise: Resolve. Every so often we need, or are forced, to stop and assess things. Sometimes, it’s assessing a risk. Other times, it’s assessing whether to go any further. The final section, Build: Momentum, discusses the most important lesson; that we are building ourselves and our future, because we are all a work in progress.  This is success in its most genuine and most realistic form.

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The Army and Low Intensity Conflict

“History shows that the bill payers of failed policy and short-sighted national security planning are the military forces of the nation.”

— Rear Admiral Phillip R. Olson, speaking to a conference on low intensity conflict

AVAILABLE NOW from author, Rick Waddell:

During the Cold War, given the threat of the Soviet military poised in Eastern Europe, the Army had to be able to wage armored warfare. The fear of low intensity conflict throughout the Cold War was the fear of bleeding to death from small bites. In this vein low intensity conflict was equivalent to an economy-of-force operation where our adversaries struck at us in our most vulnerable areas – terrorism, subversion, and insurgency. But, the challenge of low intensity conflict transcended the Cold War.

The Soviets are gone, but the style of conflict remains: the security environment of the future may look more like the urban hell of Beirut, Sarajevo, or Baghdad where hand-held missiles and crude homemade bombs threaten air and ground movement, and more like the jungles of Vietnam or the mountains of Afghanistan, where the physical and human terrain negates or reduces the effectiveness of heavy weapons and high technology devices.

Despite a large number of works that dealt with some aspect of low intensity conflict, none focused exclusively on the evolution of the Army’s response to this security challenge. Understanding this evolution is important because the problems of terrorism, insurgency, peacekeeping, and contingency operations – the categories of low intensity conflict – took on new relevance in a world without the Soviet Union.

The great bipolar confrontation had, for 45 years, submerged many of the world’s ethnic, religious, and economic passions. The end of the Cold War gave these passions a new, violent and bloody freedom. Although interstate conflict remains a threat, many of the aforementioned passions give rise to internal conflicts which require the use of force in non-traditional ways. The Army did not respond well to the challenge in the past, costing thousands of American lives and setting up the only strategic defeat that the United States has suffered. By the early 1990s, the United States government once again determined that it wanted the capability to respond to these challenges.

The changes in the early 1990s to the national strategy and the subordinate military strategy placed far greater emphasis on low intensity missions for the Army than had been the case since the early 1960s. Much of the post-Cold War Army would be based in the continental United States, and organized for rapid deployability in response to regional crises. Thus, the greater focus on conflict at the lower end of the spectrum colored the Army’s, as well as the nation’s, foreign policy abilities in the rest of the decade. Understanding the process of organizational change in the military, then, is necessary to the appropriate management of the Army’s mission. If the Army does not prepare well to enact changed national strategy, the costs, as Admiral Olson’s quotation above points out, are quite high in human terms. And, as the defeat in Vietnam demonstrated, the political costs to the nation are quite high, too. We have now engaged in more than a decade of war after the 9-11 attacks, mostly of the low intensity variety. This book sets the stage for understanding the process the Army went through before it entered that decade, and can help us understand how the Army changed during the war.

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UPCOMING | The Army and Low Intensity Conflict

“History shows that the bill payers of failed policy and short-sighted national security planning are the military forces of the nation.”

— Rear Admiral Phillip R. Olson, speaking to a conference on low intensity conflict

From author, Rick Waddell.

Click here for more details on the book.

The Army & Low Intesity Conflict by Rick Waddell

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Generation X Approved – Top 20 Keys to Effective Leadership

Generation X Approved - Top 20 Keys to Effective Leadership

Available Now

Leaders aren’t born they are made. And they are made just like anything else, through hard work. And that’s the price we’ll have to pay to achieve that goal, or any goal. 

—Vince Lombardi

As Generation X managers and executives are now tasked with running companies, there is a fundamental and critical component of business that they cannot push off or delegate and expect that someone else will have it covered—LEADERSHIP.  And at its core, leadership is about one thing and one thing only—connecting with people.

In corporate America, executives often forget that their objective is not only to manage the company processes, or to supervise the production of widgets or services.  Equally important (if not more so), they must lead, hire and retain the people all organizations need to become or remain a successful enterprise.

Another challenge for emerging Generation X leaders is to do more with less, which often means developing a more productive workforce. Complicating this is that as leaders they must direct and inspire people that have different generational values. A successful 21st century leader must be able to guide not only their Generation X peers but also the newly emerging Generation Y employees through difficult business challenges. All while mitigating the loss of the technical knowledge and skills of the retiring Baby Boomer workforce. To do this, they must have the leadership ability to align their generational peers, inspire Generation Y and set a clear direction, to maintain productivity, and motivate and influence a workforce that has fewer skills but more expectations.

Years ago, there was a study done in the world of education that looked at teacher perceptions and student performance.  At a high level, the report showed a strong correlation between perception and performance. When teachers believed their students would perform and the students themselves believed in that perception—even the lower performing students tended to meet the higher expectations.

So, what does this have to do with leadership?

It’s about perceptions and performance.

Imagine if we believed in our employees to do exceptional work. Imagine if we stopped hearing about the talent shortage and stopped saying how unprepared the next generation is to work in this environment. Imagine if we actually believed that they could live up to the hype. If we tamped down the anxiety about not being prepared for the next phase of business we may actually see a world where people step up and outperform our expectations. That is what good leaders accomplish—they unlock the potential of the people they lead.

This book gives you twenty specific keys to help you become the type of leader that your company or organization needs today and in the future. Keys that will help perception and performance merge for you into the reality of successful leadership.

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Upcoming – DEFENDER DOLPHINS | The Story of Project Short Time

DEFENDER DOLPHINS | The Story of Project Short Time

The full truth about the world’s first DEFENDER DOLPHINS has never been told — until now!

Meet Garth, John, Slan, Tinker and Toad, Project Short Time’s highly trained defender dolphins who protected a key ammunition pier in Vietnam — and laid a foundation for modern-day partnerships with dolphins, many of them their descendants.

Learn how the author — the Navy’s First Marine Mammal Officer — as well as all the scientists, engineers, military leaders, and trainers built the Navy’s SECRET Marine Mammal Program literally from scratch, added to scientific knowledge, and successfully saved lives and high value resources during the Vietnam War.

Included inside are:

• Never-before-seen historic photographs.

• A timeline of events, a map, and a glossary.

• Behind-the-scenes human-interest stories.

• Profiles of key personnel.

• A look at the defender dolphins and other key marine mammals.

• A where-are-they-now summary.

• A refutation of common misconceptions and distortions about military dolphins.

 

Detailed and fascinating account of a clandestine effort undertaken decades ago during the Vietnam war...”

— James Zumwalt, Lieutenant Colonel, USMC (ret.), son of Admiral Elmo R. (Bud) Zumwalt Jr., the Chief of Naval Operations who ordered the deployment of Project Short Time

Of great interest to readers…”

— Ricou Browning, author/creator of the popular 1960s movie and television franchise Flipper

Hal Goforth’s remarkable story details for the first time the partnership forged between man and dolphins...”

— Terrie M. Williams., Ph.D., Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz

DEFENDER DOLPHINS: The Story of Project Short Time is the never-before-told eyewitness account of a unique and daring SECRET project during the Vietnam War involving the first-ever military use of dolphins.

Even though the facts contained in DEFENDER DOLPHINS were declassified in 1992, no one has attempted to document the amazing project — until now. Myths and lies have filled the void, calling into question the integrity of the program that saved lives in Vietnam, added to scientific knowledge, and laid a foundation for modern-day partnerships with trained dolphins, many of them descendants of the original defender dolphins. Ten years in the making, DEFENDER DOLPHINS corrects the misconceptions by spelling out the true story.

DEFENDER DOLPHINS begins with the early days of nascent marine mammal research at California’s Naval Ordnance Test Station China Lake and Point Mugu Naval Missile Center, and follows the “Secret Fish People” at the Naval Undersea Center Hawaii Lab, to deployment of the Swimmer Defense System at Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam. Behind-the-scenes stories bring to life the men and women who sacrificed to make Project Short Time a success. The book also effectively refutes many of the rumors, distortions, and misinformation still floating around about military use of dolphins.

DEFENDER DOLPHINS highlights the vision, ingenuity, persistence, and personal sacrifice of the pioneers who braved low budgets, brutal deadlines, and bureaucratic snafus to achieve something new and great with Garth, John, Slan, Tinker and Toad — the defender dolphins.

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DEFENDER DOLPHINS | The Story of Project Short Time

DEFENDER DOLPHINS | The Story of Project Short Time

Booksellers or organizations interested in placing wholesale orders can contact us to request details and information.

Distributor: Ingram
Page count: 252
Hardback (with dust-jacket): ISBN 978-1-937592-30-1 Retail: $ 23.95
Trade Paperback: ISBN 978-1-937592-31-8 Retail: $13.95

The full truth about the world’s first DEFENDER DOLPHINS has never been told — until now!

Meet Garth, John, Slan, Tinker and Toad, Project Short Time’s highly trained defender dolphins who protected a key ammunition pier in Vietnam — and laid a foundation for modern-day partnerships with dolphins, many of them their descendants.

Learn how the author — the Navy’s First Marine Mammal Officer — as well as all the scientists, engineers, military leaders, and trainers built the Navy’s SECRET Marine Mammal Program literally from scratch, added to scientific knowledge, and successfully saved lives and high value resources during the Vietnam War.

Included inside are:

• Never-before-seen historic photographs.

• A timeline of events, a map, and a glossary.

• Behind-the-scenes human-interest stories.

• Profiles of key personnel.

• A look at the defender dolphins and other key marine mammals.

• A where-are-they-now summary.

• A refutation of common misconceptions and distortions about military dolphins.

 

Detailed and fascinating account of a clandestine effort undertaken decades ago during the Vietnam war...”

— James Zumwalt, Lieutenant Colonel, USMC (ret.), son of Admiral Elmo R. (Bud) Zumwalt Jr., the Chief of Naval Operations who ordered the deployment of Project Short Time

Of great interest to readers…”

— Ricou Browning, author/creator of the popular 1960s movie and television franchise Flipper

Hal Goforth’s remarkable story details for the first time the partnership forged between man and dolphins...”

— Terrie M. Williams., Ph.D., Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz

DEFENDER DOLPHINS: The Story of Project Short Time is the never-before-told eyewitness account of a unique and daring SECRET project during the Vietnam War involving the first-ever military use of dolphins.

Even though the facts contained in DEFENDER DOLPHINS were declassified in 1992, no one has attempted to document the amazing project — until now. Myths and lies have filled the void, calling into question the integrity of the program that saved lives in Vietnam, added to scientific knowledge, and laid a foundation for modern-day partnerships with trained dolphins, many of them descendants of the original defender dolphins. Ten years in the making, DEFENDER DOLPHINS corrects the misconceptions by spelling out the true story.

DEFENDER DOLPHINS begins with the early days of nascent marine mammal research at California’s Naval Ordnance Test Station China Lake and Point Mugu Naval Missile Center, and follows the “Secret Fish People” at the Naval Undersea Center Hawaii Lab, to deployment of the Swimmer Defense System at Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam. Behind-the-scenes stories bring to life the men and women who sacrificed to make Project Short Time a success. The book also effectively refutes many of the rumors, distortions, and misinformation still floating around about military use of dolphins.

DEFENDER DOLPHINS highlights the vision, ingenuity, persistence, and personal sacrifice of the pioneers who braved low budgets, brutal deadlines, and bureaucratic snafus to achieve something new and great with Garth, John, Slan, Tinker and Toad — the defender dolphins.

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DOOMSDAY: Iran ~ The Clock is Ticking

DOOMSDAY: Iran ~ The Clock is Ticking

Release date: 12/12/2012 (under our Fortis nonfiction imprint)

AVAILABLE NOW from James G. Zumwalt:

And so the clock ticks closer….

This book seeks to give the reader a comprehensive understanding of the Iranian leadership’s mindset as it has played out and continues to play out on a wide range of issues—how it worked to implement Islamist doctrine into Iran’s constitution; how it worked to use the US Iranian hostage crisis as means of unifying domestic opposition behind the theocracy; how it could have ended in two years an Iran-Iraq war that took eight; how it was willing to sacrifice its greatest treasure in an effort to defeat Saddam’s army; how it thrives on hypocrisy and its people’s willingness to accept it; how it seeks to stamp out the country’s true Persian identity; how it utilizes the extra-territoriality mandate of its constitution to justify terrorist attacks anywhere in the world; and, most importantly, what its plans for Iran’s future means for America’s.

It is an outstanding read for anyone trying to understand what makes Iranian leaders like Ali Khamenei and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad tick. The book is peppered with fascinating details and accounts that help simplify the driving motivations behind a complex mindset committed to achieving a goal it so believes it has been ordained to achieve.

Armed with such an understanding, the reader cannot help but realize Iran’s leadership has set into motion its own Doomsday Clock–one fast approaching midnight!

About the Doomsday Clock

Sixty-five years ago, a universally recognized means for assessing global vulnerability to self-destruction based on man’s development of weapons of mass destruction was established.

As of 2007, that vulnerability assessment began to include man-made catastrophes related to climate change and emerging technologies.

Dubbed the “Doomsday Clock,” it is monitored by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (BAS) in Washington, D.C. When these scientists determine man’s actions or inaction are allowing such vulnerabilities to significantly increase the danger to mankind, the minute hand of the clock is moved closer to midnight—with the number of ticks reflected by the seriousness of the danger. Alternatively, a movement of the hand farther away symbolizes a reduced likelihood such an event will occur.

Over these past six and a half decades, the minute hand has covered a fifteen minute spread, springing precariously close to midnight before easing back. The decision on any adjustment is made by the organization’s Board of Directors, after consultation with their Board of Sponsors—a group that includes 18 Nobel Laureates.

Adjustments to the Clock are not made annually but on an as-needed basis. When an adjustment is required—which has occurred twenty times during the Clock’s existence—normally it is made in the month of January. In 2007, the Clock was moved forward two minutes from its 2002 position, to five minutes before midnight; in 2010, it was moved backward to six minutes; and, most recently, in January 2012, an adjustment was made moving it forward again to the 2007 five-minute-before-midnight mark.

In 2012, when the Doomsday Clock’s hand moved one minute closer to midnight, it was attributed to three developments: (1) The narrowly avoided disaster at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant triggered by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami; (2) the transition of power and control of North Korea’s nuclear weapons to another generation of the Kim dynasty; and (3) Iran’s designs on developing nuclear weapons.

It is the third development that is most worrisome as a theocracy, which has proven itself to be ruthless and brutal, in Tehran communicates to the civilized world exactly what violent intentions it has for the future—all while refusing to come clean on whether those intentions include a nuclear weapons capability.

 

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Let There Be Light | Creating A Life Worth Living

Let There Be Light | Creating A Life Worth Living

Available Now as paperbackhardback and ebook.

Order at Barnes & Noble

From the author, Dr. Demetrius S. Carolina

There are two important points to make about human beings:

  1. We all have an expiration date. No one knows how long they have on this Earth. What we do with the time we do have is what matters.
  2. There is a difference between existing and living.

 A couple of critical things to give some thought to. Wouldn’t you agree?

 Think, also, about this.

 Who, ultimately, is responsible for your life?

 You—of course!

 And “You” are the biggest commitment you’ll ever make in life.

For the rest of your life to “work well”… and for you to be able to help others… you have to focus on yourself first. But, in order to do that, we all need help and guidance along the way.

And that is the purpose of this book… to offer practical guidance on how to get from where you are to where you want to be in your spiritual life—and we all know that what is in our heads and hearts can be manifested in the real world.

What you will take away from this book is how the things you control are the key in creating a life worth living and having a relationship with yourself and others that is fulfilling and sustainable… one that can last… forever.

I have served others as a counselor, pastor, teacher, leader and friend for many years. In that time I have seen good people, who were well intentioned, go through life—just getting by—existing rather than truly living it to the fullest. There are many reasons for this situation; the most prominent being that human beings are creatures of habit. We are most comfortable with what we are most familiar.

Left on our own, it’s often very hard to make changes to improve our lot in life. In fact, for many it’s hard to even pinpoint what’s really wrong without some sort of outside stimulus—some prod—that goads us to evaluate or assess ourselves. And while everybody is responsible for their own lives; it certainly helps to have something or someone that becomes a catalyst to break through your life routine and be the “kick in the pants” needed to take action.

Life is short and too often many have a voice inside that says, “I wish I had…,” or “If I only…,” or worse it’s whispering to you, “You’re just not good enough… not smart enough….” The voice in and of itself is not a terrible thing. I believe all humans have heard it inside their head at some point. The tragedy is when that voice becomes a constant—never ending—drumbeat in your head that becomes a question you can’t answer or a statement that you can’t refute. It becomes something you believe about yourself that is only true if you let it become true.

I just shared with you something that is worth an incalculable amount of money if you take it to heart. Things, bad and good, become true only if you let them or make them come true.

In this book we’ll talk about letting light come into your life and creating a life worth living.

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