Tag Archives: National Security

In the News | Author, Kerry Kachejian on panel discussion – The Impact of a Weakened Military

Our author, Kerry Kachejian, Colonel, USAR (Retired) is one of the United States most qualified soldiers and engineers, having served in and supported reconstruction operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan as well as relief operations during Hurricane Katrina. He is the author of, SUVs Suck in Combat, and recently participated on a panel discussion about whether potential budget cuts will weaken the United States military (and he points out how they have in the past).

Here’s the video of the discussion:

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The Army and Low Intensity Conflict

“History shows that the bill payers of failed policy and short-sighted national security planning are the military forces of the nation.”

— Rear Admiral Phillip R. Olson, speaking to a conference on low intensity conflict

AVAILABLE NOW from author, Rick Waddell:

During the Cold War, given the threat of the Soviet military poised in Eastern Europe, the Army had to be able to wage armored warfare. The fear of low intensity conflict throughout the Cold War was the fear of bleeding to death from small bites. In this vein low intensity conflict was equivalent to an economy-of-force operation where our adversaries struck at us in our most vulnerable areas – terrorism, subversion, and insurgency. But, the challenge of low intensity conflict transcended the Cold War.

The Soviets are gone, but the style of conflict remains: the security environment of the future may look more like the urban hell of Beirut, Sarajevo, or Baghdad where hand-held missiles and crude homemade bombs threaten air and ground movement, and more like the jungles of Vietnam or the mountains of Afghanistan, where the physical and human terrain negates or reduces the effectiveness of heavy weapons and high technology devices.

Despite a large number of works that dealt with some aspect of low intensity conflict, none focused exclusively on the evolution of the Army’s response to this security challenge. Understanding this evolution is important because the problems of terrorism, insurgency, peacekeeping, and contingency operations – the categories of low intensity conflict – took on new relevance in a world without the Soviet Union.

The great bipolar confrontation had, for 45 years, submerged many of the world’s ethnic, religious, and economic passions. The end of the Cold War gave these passions a new, violent and bloody freedom. Although interstate conflict remains a threat, many of the aforementioned passions give rise to internal conflicts which require the use of force in non-traditional ways. The Army did not respond well to the challenge in the past, costing thousands of American lives and setting up the only strategic defeat that the United States has suffered. By the early 1990s, the United States government once again determined that it wanted the capability to respond to these challenges.

The changes in the early 1990s to the national strategy and the subordinate military strategy placed far greater emphasis on low intensity missions for the Army than had been the case since the early 1960s. Much of the post-Cold War Army would be based in the continental United States, and organized for rapid deployability in response to regional crises. Thus, the greater focus on conflict at the lower end of the spectrum colored the Army’s, as well as the nation’s, foreign policy abilities in the rest of the decade. Understanding the process of organizational change in the military, then, is necessary to the appropriate management of the Army’s mission. If the Army does not prepare well to enact changed national strategy, the costs, as Admiral Olson’s quotation above points out, are quite high in human terms. And, as the defeat in Vietnam demonstrated, the political costs to the nation are quite high, too. We have now engaged in more than a decade of war after the 9-11 attacks, mostly of the low intensity variety. This book sets the stage for understanding the process the Army went through before it entered that decade, and can help us understand how the Army changed during the war.

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DOOMSDAY: Iran ~ The Clock is Ticking

DOOMSDAY: Iran ~ The Clock is Ticking

Release date: 12/12/2012 (under our Fortis nonfiction imprint)

AVAILABLE NOW from James G. Zumwalt:

And so the clock ticks closer….

This book seeks to give the reader a comprehensive understanding of the Iranian leadership’s mindset as it has played out and continues to play out on a wide range of issues—how it worked to implement Islamist doctrine into Iran’s constitution; how it worked to use the US Iranian hostage crisis as means of unifying domestic opposition behind the theocracy; how it could have ended in two years an Iran-Iraq war that took eight; how it was willing to sacrifice its greatest treasure in an effort to defeat Saddam’s army; how it thrives on hypocrisy and its people’s willingness to accept it; how it seeks to stamp out the country’s true Persian identity; how it utilizes the extra-territoriality mandate of its constitution to justify terrorist attacks anywhere in the world; and, most importantly, what its plans for Iran’s future means for America’s.

It is an outstanding read for anyone trying to understand what makes Iranian leaders like Ali Khamenei and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad tick. The book is peppered with fascinating details and accounts that help simplify the driving motivations behind a complex mindset committed to achieving a goal it so believes it has been ordained to achieve.

Armed with such an understanding, the reader cannot help but realize Iran’s leadership has set into motion its own Doomsday Clock–one fast approaching midnight!

About the Doomsday Clock

Sixty-five years ago, a universally recognized means for assessing global vulnerability to self-destruction based on man’s development of weapons of mass destruction was established.

As of 2007, that vulnerability assessment began to include man-made catastrophes related to climate change and emerging technologies.

Dubbed the “Doomsday Clock,” it is monitored by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (BAS) in Washington, D.C. When these scientists determine man’s actions or inaction are allowing such vulnerabilities to significantly increase the danger to mankind, the minute hand of the clock is moved closer to midnight—with the number of ticks reflected by the seriousness of the danger. Alternatively, a movement of the hand farther away symbolizes a reduced likelihood such an event will occur.

Over these past six and a half decades, the minute hand has covered a fifteen minute spread, springing precariously close to midnight before easing back. The decision on any adjustment is made by the organization’s Board of Directors, after consultation with their Board of Sponsors—a group that includes 18 Nobel Laureates.

Adjustments to the Clock are not made annually but on an as-needed basis. When an adjustment is required—which has occurred twenty times during the Clock’s existence—normally it is made in the month of January. In 2007, the Clock was moved forward two minutes from its 2002 position, to five minutes before midnight; in 2010, it was moved backward to six minutes; and, most recently, in January 2012, an adjustment was made moving it forward again to the 2007 five-minute-before-midnight mark.

In 2012, when the Doomsday Clock’s hand moved one minute closer to midnight, it was attributed to three developments: (1) The narrowly avoided disaster at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant triggered by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami; (2) the transition of power and control of North Korea’s nuclear weapons to another generation of the Kim dynasty; and (3) Iran’s designs on developing nuclear weapons.

It is the third development that is most worrisome as a theocracy, which has proven itself to be ruthless and brutal, in Tehran communicates to the civilized world exactly what violent intentions it has for the future—all while refusing to come clean on whether those intentions include a nuclear weapons capability.

 

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Coming Soon | Crisis in the Congo

Coming in September

A new CIA operative, Tom Russell, continues his adventures in Africa!

First introduced in The New Casablanca | Madness in Liberia… when the United States needs a tough man, to count on in Africa, they send in a Marine—Russell.

One of the most tragic stories in the history of Africa unfolded in the dark abyss of the Congo.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) could not escape widespread and unprecedented violence from rogue rebel forces, mercenaries, and criminal enterprises. Corruption, illegal smuggling, and ungoverned regions in the deep jungle helped ruthless thugs exploit the Congo’s vast, untapped mineral wealth. One of the world’s most remote locations, the  Belgian Congo, could not move beyond the epic inhumanity inflicted by its former colonial ruler. Under Belgian rule the practice of cutting off arms to maintain order was a common occurrence; just one example of brutality beyond conception inflicted on the Congolese. Even after emerging from colonial rule in 1960, a despot, Joseph Mobutu, forced his way to power after the assassination of Patrice Lumumba. Under Mobutu’s rule, death became commonplace and widespread violence blanketed the Congo and spilled over into neighboring peaceful countries. Western countries stood idly by as Africa’s first large-scale war claimed nearly five million lives over its nine year period.

* * *

Crisis in the Congo by Anthony C. FabianoIn 2006, American Marine Corps officer, Tom Russell, on loan to the Central Intelligence Agency, arrives in the Congo. His mission: to help keep the peace in preparation for the upcoming DRC Presidential election. In Kinshasa he finds a nation on the brink of destruction. As the country and region spiral out of control, many factions transform the Congo into a blood-drenched powder keg: Belgians still play a vital economic role in their former colony; former Soviet Union KGB funnel blood diamonds out of the country; North Koreans and Iranians search for black market uranium; al-Qaeda wants a foothold in Africa; Hezbollah operatives smuggle weapons, and corrupt government officials seek personal gain. Greed governs everyday life and fuels the obliteration of hope for the Congolese.

Russell faces those determined to keep the Congo in utter chaos and he is not about to let that happen. He encounters an old lover, an Israeli Mossad agent, who arrives in the Congo  searching for a missing atomic bomb sold in the early 1970s to South Africa; believed to have been  traded to the former Congo President Mobutu for blood diamonds. Raw emotions from their torrid and never fully forgotten love affair further complicate a mission whose stakes have grown exponentially higher. His mentor, a British Colonel who works for MI6, arrives in Kinshasa to provide much needed assistance and Russell comes into contact with two retired CIA agents who served in the Congo during the 1960s—they teach him more about Africa than he would ever find out and learn on his own.

The focus on stopping the spread of the highest grade of uranium on the world’s black market quickly shifts; as the race is on to track down the loose nuclear weapon first and then control access to the uranium deposits. The fast paced action illustrates the true nature, challenges and complexity of clandestine operations in the Congo and highlights the struggle for stability in modern day Africa.

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Profiles in Patriotic Leadership

Profiles in Patriotic Leadership

The ebook and paperback is available now from Greg Slavonic, author of Leadership In Action

“Men make history, and not the other way around. In periods where there is no leadership, society stands still. Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.”

– Harry S. Truman

Profiles in Patriotic LeadershipLeadership is a word heard in the news every day.

It has received more emphasis in the past four years than ever before due to what some would say a failure of leadership by many in positions of authority within our government and corporate America.

The need for leadership has perhaps never been more important than it is today.

Leaders who come from a military career or have previously served in the military have a perspective on how to lead and how to be effective. In the military, when a person is given the responsibility to lead, he or she does exactly that – they lead.

Those serving under them can trust and believe in what they say. Their word is their bond.

Today we need such honesty… we need such faith and trust… more importantly we need our leaders to do the job required of them.

That’s what this book is about. ORDER NOW

 Contributors (alphabetically):

Brian T. Costello, Captain, U.S.Navy (Retired)

D. Kevin Elliott, Master Chief, U.S. Navy

Thomas F. Hall, former Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower & Reserve Affairs)

Steve Valley, Command Sergeant Major, U.S. Army Reserve

John Wagner, Major, U.S. Army Reserve

Donald J. Wetekam, Lieutenant General, USAF (Retired)

Rob Wray, Rear Admiral, U.S.Navy

James G. Zumwalt, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)

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Coming Soon | Profiles in Patriotic Leadership

From Dennis Lowery |

I’m proud to tell you a little bit about a new book we’re publishing (coming in July) from Greg Slavonic, author of Leadership In Action:

“Men make history, and not the other way around. In periods where there is no leadership, society stands still. Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.”

- Harry S. Truman

Profiles in Patriotic LeadershipLeadership is a word heard in the news every day.

It has received more emphasis in the past four years than ever before due to what some would say a failure of leadership by many in positions of authority within our government and corporate America.

The need for leadership has perhaps never been more important than it is today.

Leaders who come from a military career or have previously served in the military have a perspective on how to lead and how to be effective. In the military, when a person is given the responsibility to lead, he or she does exactly that – they lead.

Those serving under them can trust and believe in what they say. Their word is their bond.

Today we need such honesty… we need such faith and trust… more importantly we need our leaders to do the job required of them.

That’s what this book is about.

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Memorial Day | Something more than a three-day weekend

From Dennis Lowery

Our veterans and current service men and women know a side of life that someone who has not served may not grasp fully. It does not mean that one has lived or lives a life that is less or more than the other but rather that their scope of life and perspective is different contextually. We judge everything by experience and military service by its very nature brings with it unique experience (to say the least).

I recall vividly the day I entered boot camp, the day I reported to my ship and the day when lines were cast off for my first deployment, my first crossing of the Atlantic Ocean, onboard the USS Montgomery (FF-1082) in 1979 headed to the Middle East. These were all “beginnings” for me–they were steps into new worlds and new experiences. Serving in the United States Navy, and those I served with, taught me more about myself than I could have ever possibly learned in any other way. It put me on the path to becoming who I am today, which is not how I might have turned out otherwise.

This Memorial Day please think of it as something more than a three-day weekend (for many people). Pause at some point during your possibly hectic plans for the weekend and honor the memory of those who have served and to appreciate those who continue to serve.

I wrote the following recently and realized that my first conscious thought of what I came to believe about much in life was when I made that first crossing of the Atlantic Ocean:

“A tiny thing is Mankind, on the scale of the Universe, but in some people their soul is the Universe.”

We are all small in the grand scheme of things but some have within us the power to make our reality much larger… much more complete and to our liking. We see not just who we are, but who we can become. We appreciate what we have yet still reach towards a goal or objective. Stretching ourselves.

Those of us who were not born perfect know that each day of our life is an opportunity to learn more, do more and be more. Even if it’s only a small step, a bit of progress or when your personal circle of enlightenment expands slightly to push back the shadows and darkness of the path ahead and that borders the sides of the road we travel in life.

The above thought comes to me as part of my own set of memories and reflections for this Memorial Day. So I leave this with my best wishes for you and the following poem (that many of us can relate to about life and service).

Invictus (by the English poet William Ernest Henley (1849-1903)

Out of the night that covers me,

Black as the pit from pole to pole,

I thank whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced nor cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the Horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds and shall find me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate:

I am the captain of my soul.

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In the News | Author Kerry Kachejian – “A TRUE STORY FROM THE WAR IN IRAQ”

Read the complete article by Robert Bluey |

Kachejian told his harrowing story in a book called “SUVs Suck In Combat.” It chronicles some of the war stories that Americans never heard about the readiness challenges facing our military. The Heritage Foundation chose to profile him as part of Protect America Month, which showcases why we must commit to protecting the United States in an increasingly dangerous world.

Kerry Kachejian

Kerry Kachejian

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REVIEW | El Capitan – “this isn’t just about a career in the Navy, it’s about character”

El Capitan

From Dennis Lowery

James Palmer’s review of ¡El Capitán! | The Making of an American Naval Officer points out something very important. It’s a quality that we sorely need in all aspects of our life… and we need our leaders (corporate, government and military) to exemplify this quality. The traits of: Character, Ethics and Integrity. Their strength or lack of, in individuals, can build or break: our society, our communities, our economy, our government and our personal relationships.

We are so very proud of Frank Gamboa and his book. He exemplifies those three traits at their highest and brightest levels.

Non Sibi Sed Patriae!

Read the complete review: “A Man of Character”.

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In the News | Combat veteran Kerry Kachejian explains why U.S. military readiness is so crucial

Our author, Kerry Kachejian‘s, combat experience is discussed in the following article:

Morning Bell: Would You Take an SUV into Combat?

Read the complete article

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